Journal of Clinical Immunology

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 107–113 | Cite as

Increased spontaneous immunoglobulin secretion associated with cyclophosphamide-induced immune suppression

  • Otoniel Martínez-Maza
  • Dewey J. Moody
  • Ali R. Rezal
  • George W. Ellison
  • Lawrence W. Myers
  • Wallace W. Tourtellotte
  • John L. Fahey
Original Articles

Abstract

Spontaneous immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion by cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients (in the progressive phase) treated with monthly pulse doses of cyclophosphamide (CY) (1000–1600 mg/M2) was measured using the protein A plaque assay, to evaluate the effect of CY treatment on B-cell function. Surprisingly, an increase, rather than a decrease, in Ig-secreting cells was seen following CY treatment. CY-treated MS patients averaged 1380±535 spontaneous total (IgM+G+A) Ig plaque-forming cells (PFC) per 1×106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC), measured at 15–22 days after monthly CY administration, while healthy adults had 280±47 Ig PFC/106 MNC, and MS patients not treated with CY had 300±43 Ig PFC/106 MNC. The observed increase was due to an increase in IgG and IgA PFC. PFC levels remained elevated for 4 weeks following CY treatment, decreasing to control levels by 7–8 weeks post-CY. A small increase in serum IgG level was noted after >12 months of pulse CY therapy; no increase was seen in CSF IgG levels. A preferential decrease in the number of CD4+ T cells was also seen in the CY-treated MS patients. We propose that the observed increase in the number of spontaneous Ig PFC was due to the CY-induced disruption of the CD4+ T cell-mediated control ofin vivo activated B cells.

Key words

Cyclophosphamide immunoglobulin immune suppression immune regulation multiple sclerosis 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Otoniel Martínez-Maza
    • 1
  • Dewey J. Moody
    • 1
  • Ali R. Rezal
    • 1
  • George W. Ellison
    • 2
  • Lawrence W. Myers
    • 2
  • Wallace W. Tourtellotte
    • 2
  • John L. Fahey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer CenterUCLA School of MedicineLos Angeles
  2. 2.Department of Neurology and Reed Neurological Research CenterUCLA School of MedicineLos Angeles

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