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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 77–83 | Cite as

Parent and child causal attributions during clinical interviews

  • Bruce E. Compas
  • Howard S. Adelman
  • Pamela C. Freundl
  • Perry Nelson
  • Linda Taylor
Article

Abstract

Attributions made by children and their parents for the cause of the child's clinical problem were monitored during assessment interviews. Results support previously observed differences obtained through questionnaires, with parents making more attributions than their children to characteristics of the child. This pattern was affected by variations in interview format. Parents and children differed in the locus of their attributions when interviewed individually, but these differences were not present when families were interviewed with both parents and children present. Implications for the methodology of attribution research with child-clinical populations are highlighted.

Keywords

Clinical Interview Clinical Problem Causal Attribution Interview Format Assessment Interview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce E. Compas
    • 1
  • Howard S. Adelman
    • 1
  • Pamela C. Freundl
    • 1
  • Perry Nelson
    • 1
  • Linda Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaLos Angeles

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