Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 425–440 | Cite as

Parent-identified problem preschoolers: Mother-child interaction during play at intake and 1-year follow-up

  • Susan B. Campbell
  • Anna Marie Breaux
  • Linda J. Ewing
  • Emily K. Szumowski
  • Elizabeth W. Pierce
Article

Abstract

Parent-referred 2- and 3-year-olds and controls, participating in a longitudinal study of hyperactivity and related behavior problems, were observed with their mothers during play at an initial assessment and a 1-year follow-up. Mothers of problem children provided more redirection initially and made more negative control statements at follow-up than mothers of controls; problem youngsters tended to play more aggressively. Sex differences were prominent. Mothers of boys, regardless of referral status, were more directive at the initial assessment;their sons were less cooperative and somewhat more aggressive in their play. Maternal involvement in play decreased over time, possibly as a response to developmental changes in children's play. Group by time interactions indicated that mothers of control children provided fewer negative control statements at follow-up relative to mothers of problem children and to their own levels at the first assessment; mothers of problem youngsters redirected their children less than they had initially. Mothers of boys were also less directive at follow-up relative to their initial levels. Situational and developmental factors are discussed briefly.

Keywords

Negative Control Longitudinal Study Behavior Problem Initial Level Time Interaction 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan B. Campbell
    • 1
  • Anna Marie Breaux
    • 1
  • Linda J. Ewing
    • 1
  • Emily K. Szumowski
    • 1
  • Elizabeth W. Pierce
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical Psychology CenterUniversity of PittsburghPittsburgh

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