Inflammation

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 379–394 | Cite as

Effect of leukocyte hydrolases on bacteria

XIV. Bacteriolytic effects of human sera, synovial fluids, and purulent exudates onStaphylococcus aureus andStreptococcus faecalis: Modulation by Cohn's fraction II and by polyelectrolytes
  • Nurit Ne'eman
  • M. N. Sela
  • Shoshana Chanes
  • Luzia Bierkenfeld
  • Dan Kutani
  • Meir Lahav
  • Isaac Ginsburg
Original Articles

Abstract

Normal sera and plasma, derived from humans, calves, rats, rabbits, horses, human synovial fluids, inflammatory exudates, and leukocyte extracts, when sufficiently diluted are highly bacteriolytic forStaph. aureus, Strep, faecalis, B. subtilis and to a variety of gram-negative rods. On the other hand, concentrated serum or the other body fluids are usually not bacteriolytic for these bacterial species. While the lysis ofStaph. aureus andB. subtilis by diluted serum is not lysozyme dependent, lysis ofStrep. faecalis is absolutely dependent on the concentration of lysozyme. The lytic factor in human serum is present in Cohn's fractions III, IV, and V. It is nondialyzable, resistant to heating for 75° C for 20 min, and acts optimally at pH 5.0. Like leukocyte extracts, synovial fluids, and inflammatory exudates, it lyses only young staphylococci. The inability of concentrated serum to lyseStaph. aureus andStrep, faecalis is due to the presence in the gamma globulin fraction of a potent inhibitor, which can be partly removed by dilution or by adsorption upon the homologous bacteria. Lysis of the bacteria is also strongly inhibited by Cohn's fraction II (gamma globulin) by high-molecular-weight DNA, heparin, liquoid, and histone. The possible role played by serum globulin in the protection of bacteria against degradation by leukocyte is discussed.

Keywords

Heparin Human Serum Lysozyme Synovial Fluid Bacterial Species 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nurit Ne'eman
    • 1
  • M. N. Sela
    • 1
  • Shoshana Chanes
    • 1
  • Luzia Bierkenfeld
    • 1
  • Dan Kutani
    • 1
  • Meir Lahav
    • 1
  • Isaac Ginsburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oral BiologyHebrew University-Hadassah School of Dental MedicineJerusalemIsrael

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