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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 259–267 | Cite as

Dominance hierarchies in normal and conduct-disordered children

  • M. Mary Konstantareas
  • Soula Homatidis
Article

Abstract

Two groups of conduct-disordered children in day treatment and two groups of normal matched controls were observed over eight sessions in a free-play situation. The purpose of the study was to examine whether disturbed children formed dominance hierarchies, and to compare the power relations among disturbed children to those of normal peers. Results indicated that the hospitalized children did form dominance hierarchies, although their hierarchies were not as stable as those of their normal peers. Moreover, an inverse relation was noted between intragroup conflict and the hierarchy's stability. In addition, the pattern of targeting differed between the normal and disturbed youngsters. Conflict among the children in both control groups tended to be concentrated among members of adjacent ranks. The disturbed children, on the other hand, were less discriminating as to their target's rank, exhibited greater intragroup conflict, and lost more frequently in their agonistic encounters.

Keywords

Matched Control Power Relation Inverse Relation Dominance Hierarchy Agonistic Encounter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Mary Konstantareas
    • 1
  • Soula Homatidis
    • 1
  1. 1.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryChild and Family Studies CentreTorontoCanada

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