American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 59–80 | Cite as

A brief history of primary prevention in the twentieth century: 1908 to 1980

  • John Spaulding
  • Philip Balch
Article

Keywords

Twentieth Century Social Psychology Health Psychology Primary Prevention 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Spaulding
    • 1
  • Philip Balch
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ArizonaTucson

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