American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 303–326 | Cite as

Mexican Americans and mental health: A selected review and recommendations for mental health service delivery

  • Susan E. Keefe
  • J. Manuel Casas
Article

Keywords

Mental Health Health Service Social Psychology Mental Health Service Health Psychology 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Reference Notes

  1. Lopez, S.Studies of mental health service utilization by Mexican Americans: A review and a methodological evaluation. Unpublished manuscript, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978.Google Scholar
  2. Aranda, P., & Padilla, A. M.A study of suicide among Mexican Americans in Santa Barbara County. Unpublished manuscript, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1973.Google Scholar
  3. 3. Loya, F.Increases in Chicano suicide, Denver, Colorado: 1960–1975; What can be done? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Suicidology, Los Angeles, 1976.Google Scholar
  4. 4. Morales, E.Reconstructing families: an initial step toward developing community clusters. Paper presented at the biannual meeting of the National Coalition of Hispanic Mental Health and Human Service Organizations, Houston, Texas, 1978.Google Scholar

References

  1. Acosta, F. X. Ethnic variables in psychotherapy: The Mexican American. In J. L. Martinez, Jr. (Ed.),Chicano psychology. New York: Academic Press, 1977.Google Scholar
  2. Acosta, F. X., & Sheehan, J. G. Psychotherapist ethnicity and expertise as determinants of self-disclosure. In M. R. Miranda (Ed.),Psychotherapy with the Spanish-speaking: Issues in research and service delivery. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 3, 1976.Google Scholar
  3. Aguilar, I., & Wood, V. N. Therapy through a death ritual.Social Work, 1976,21(1), 49–54.Google Scholar
  4. Alvirez, D., & Bean, F. D. The Mexican American family. In C. H. Mindel & R. W. Habenstein (Eds.),Ethnic families in America: Patterns and variations. New York: Elsevier, 1976.Google Scholar
  5. Andrulis, D. P. Ethnicity as a variable in the utilization and referral patterns of a comprehensive mental health center.Journal of Community Psychology, 1977,5, 231–237.Google Scholar
  6. Boulette, T. R. Assertive training with low income Mexican American women. In M. R. Miranda (Ed.),Psychotherapy with the Spanish-speaking: Issues in research and service delivery. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 3, 1976.Google Scholar
  7. Bruhn, J. G., & Fuentes, R. G. Cultural factors affecting utilization of services by Mexican Americans.Psychiatric Annals, 1977,7(12), 20–29.Google Scholar
  8. Burruel, G., & Chavez, N. Mental health outpatient centers: Relevant or irrelevant to Mexican Americans? In A. B. Tulipan, C. L. Attneave, & E. Kingstone (Eds.),Beyond clinic walls. University: University of Alabama Press, POCA Perspectives, 1974.Google Scholar
  9. Carrillo, C. Directions for a Chicano psychotherapy. In J. M. Casas & S. E. Keefe (Eds.),Family and mental health in the Mexican American community. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  10. Casas, J. M. Applicability of a behavioral model in serving the mental health needs of the Mexican American. In M. R. Miranda (Ed.),Psychotherapy with the Spanish-speaking: Issues in research and service delivery. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 3, 1976.Google Scholar
  11. Clark, M.Health in the Mexican-American culture. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1959.Google Scholar
  12. Costello, R. M., Vargas, L. A., Baillargeon, J. G., & Hernandez, M. C. Mexican-American behavioral adjustments in an Anglo hospital.Psychiatric Annals, 1977,7(12), 82–85.Google Scholar
  13. Creson, D. L., McKinley, C., & Evans, R. Folk medicine in Mexican-American subculture.Diseases of the Nervous System, 1969,30, 264–266.Google Scholar
  14. Cuellar, I. The utilization of mental health facilities by Mexican Americans: A test of the underutilization hypothesis (Doctoral dissertation, University of Texas, 1977).Dissertation Abstracts International, 1978,38, 3364B-3365B.Google Scholar
  15. Dworkin, A. G. Stereotypes and self-images held by native-born and foreign-born Mexican-Americans.Sociology and Social Research, 1965,49, 214–224.Google Scholar
  16. Edgerton, R. B., Karno, M., & Fernandez, I.Curanderismo in the metropolis: The diminishing role of folk-psychiatry among Los Angeles Mexican-Americans.American Journal of Psychotherapy, 1970,24, 124–134.Google Scholar
  17. Edmonson, M. S.Los Manitos — A study of institutional values. New Orleans: Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University, 1957.Google Scholar
  18. Epling, P. J., Vandale, S. E., & Steuart, G. W. Beyond the individual for the practice of social medicine: Household networks as etiologic-diagnostic units. In S. R. Ingman & A. E. Thomas (eds.),Topias and utopias in health: Policy studies. Chicago: Aldine, World Anthropology Series, 1975.Google Scholar
  19. Fabrega, H., Jr., Swartz, J. D., & Wallace, C. A. Ethnic differences in psychopathology. I. Clinical correlates under varying conditions.Archives of General Psychiatry, 1968,6, 221–235.Google Scholar
  20. Farge, E. J. A review of findings from ‘three generations’ of Chicano health care behavior.Social Science Quartely, 1977,58, 407–411.Google Scholar
  21. Gilbert, M. J. Extended family integration among second generation Mexican Americans. In J. M. Casas & S. E. Keefe (Eds.),Family and mental health in the Mexican American community. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  22. Gonzalez, N. L.The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A heritage of pride. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1967.Google Scholar
  23. Graham, J. S. The role of thecurandero in the Mexican American medicine system in west Texas. In W. D. Hand (Ed.),American folk medicine: A symposium. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  24. Granger, B. H. Some aspects of folk medicine among Spanish-speaking people in southern Arizona. In W. D. Hand (Ed.),American folk medicine: A symposium. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1976.Google Scholar
  25. Grebler, L., Moore, J. W., & Guzman, R. C.The Mexican-American people: The nation's second largest minority. New York; The Free Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  26. Griffith, B.American me. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1948.Google Scholar
  27. Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, Committee on the Family. Integrations and malintegrations in Spanish-American family patterns. InTreatment of familiesin conflict: The clinical study of family process. New York: Jason Aronson, 1970.Google Scholar
  28. Hatcher, C., & Hatcher, D. Ethnic group suicide: An analysis of Mexican American and Anglo suicide rates for El Paso, Texas.Crisis Intervention, 1975.Google Scholar
  29. Heiman, E. M., Burruel, G., & Chavez, N. Factors determining effective psychiatric outpatient treatment for Mexican-Americans.Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 1975,26, 515–517.Google Scholar
  30. Herrera, A. E., & Sanchez, V. C. Behaviorally oriented group therapy: A successful application in the treatment of low income Spanish-speaking clients. In M. R. Miranda (Ed.),Psychotherapy with the Spanish-speaking: Issues in research and service delivery. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 3, 1976.Google Scholar
  31. Holland, W. R. Mexican-American medical beliefs: Science or magic?Arizona Medicine, 1963,20, 89–102.Google Scholar
  32. Hynes, K., & Werbin, J. Group psychotherapy for Spanish-speaking women.Psychatric Annals, 1977,7(12), 52–63.Google Scholar
  33. Jaco, E. G. Social factors in mental disorders in Texas.Social Problems, 1957,4, 322–328.Google Scholar
  34. Jaco, E. G. Mental health of the Spanish American in Texas. In M. K. Opler (Ed.),Culture and mental health: Cross-cultural studies. New York: Macmillan, 1959.Google Scholar
  35. Jaco, E. G.The social epidemiology of mental disorders: A psychiatric survey of Texas. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1960.Google Scholar
  36. Karno, M., & Edgerton, R. B. Perception of mental illness in a Mexican American community.Archives of General Psychiatry, 1969,20, 233–238.Google Scholar
  37. Karno, M., & Morales, A. A community mental health service for Mexican Americans in a metropolis.Comprehensive Psychiatry, 1971,12, 116–121.Google Scholar
  38. Karno, M., Ross, R. N. & Caper, R. A. Mental health roles of physicians in a Mexican-American community.Community Mental Health Journal, 1969,5, 62–69.Google Scholar
  39. Kay, M. A.Health and illness in the barrio: Women's point of view. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Arizona, 1972.Google Scholar
  40. Keefe, S. E. Why Mexican Americans underutilize mental health clinics: Fact and fallacy. In J. M. Casas & S. E. Keefe (Eds.),Family and mental health in the Mexican American community. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  41. Keefe, S. E. Urbanization, acculturation, and extended family ties: Mexican Americans in cities.American Ethnologist, 1979,6, 349–369.Google Scholar
  42. Keefe, S. E., Padilla, A. M., & Carlos, M. L.Emotional support systems in two cultures: A comparison of Mexican Americans and Anglo Americans. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Occasional Paper No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  43. Keefe, S. E., Padilla, A. M., & Carlos, M. L. The Mexican American extended family as an emotional support system.Human Organization, 1979,38, 144–152.Google Scholar
  44. Kiev, A.Curanderismo: Mexican-American folk psychiatry. New York: Free Press, 1968.Google Scholar
  45. Kline, L. Y. Some factors in the psychiatric treatment of Spanish-Americans.American Journal of Psychiatry, 1969,125, 1674–1681.Google Scholar
  46. Kluckholn, F. R., & Strodtbeck, F.Variations in value orientations. New York: Row & Peterson, 1961.Google Scholar
  47. Knoll, F. R. Casework services for Mexican Americans.Social Casework, 1971,52, 279–284.Google Scholar
  48. Kole, D. M. A cross-cultural study of medical-psychiatric symptoms.Journal of Health and Human Behavior, 1966,7, 162–174.Google Scholar
  49. Kreisman, J. J. Thecurandero's apprentice: A therapeutic integration of folk and medical healing.American Journal of Psychiatry, 1975,132, 81–83.Google Scholar
  50. Laosa, L. M., Burstein, A. G., & Martin, H. W. Mental health consultation in a rural Chicano community: Crystal City.Aztlan, 1975,6, 433–453.Google Scholar
  51. Leonard, O., & Loomis, C. P.Culture of a contemporary rural community: El Cerrito, New Mexico. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Economics, Rural Life Studies No. 1, 1941. (Reprinted in C. Cortes (Ed.),The New Mexican Hispano. New York: Arno Press, 1974.)Google Scholar
  52. Libo, L. M., Dunbar, R. L., & Warren, M. M.A study of first admissions to the New Mexico state hospital 1958 and 1959. Santa Fe: New Mexico Department of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, 1962,.Google Scholar
  53. Lin, P.M.-C.Voluntary kinship and voluntary association in a Mexican-American community. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Kansas, 1963.Google Scholar
  54. Macklin, B. J.Structural stability and culture change in a Mexican-American community. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 1963.Google Scholar
  55. Madsen, W.Society and health in the lower Rio Grande Valley. Austin: Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, 1961.Google Scholar
  56. Madsen, W.The Mexican Americans of south Texas. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston, 1964.Google Scholar
  57. Madsen, W. Mexican-Americans and Anglo-Americans: A comparative study of mental health in Texas. In S. C. Plog & R. B. Edgerton (Eds.),Changing perspectives in mental illness. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston, 1969.Google Scholar
  58. Martinez, C. Community mental health and the Chicano movement.American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 1973,43, 595–601.Google Scholar
  59. Martinez, C. Psychiatric consultation in a rural Mexican-American clinic.Psychiatric Annals, 1977,7(12), 74–80.Google Scholar
  60. Martinez, C., & Martin, H. W. Folk diseases among urban Mexican-Americans.Journal of the American Medical Association, 1966,196(2), 161–164.Google Scholar
  61. McLemore, S. D. Ethnic attitudes toward hospitalization: An illustrative comparison of Anglos and Mexican Americans.Social Science Quarterly, 1963,43, 341–346.Google Scholar
  62. Meadow, A., & Stoker, D. Symptomatic behavior of hospitalized patients.Archives of General Psychiatry, 1965,12, 267–277.Google Scholar
  63. Meyer, G. G. The professional in the Chicano community.Psychiatric Annals, 1977,7(12), 9–19.Google Scholar
  64. Miranda, M. R., Andujo, E., Caballero, I. L., Guerrero, C. C., & Ramos, R. A. Mexican American dropouts in psychotherapy as related to level of acculturation. In M. R. Miranda (Ed.),Psychotherapy with the Spanish-speaking: Issues in research and service delivery. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 3, 1976.Google Scholar
  65. Morales, A. The need for non-traditional mental health programs in thebarrio. In J. M. Casas & S. E. Keefe (Eds.),Family and mental health in the Mexican American community. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  66. Nall, F. C., & Speilberg, J. Social and cultural factors in the responses of Mexican-Americans to medical treatment.Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1967,8, 299–308.Google Scholar
  67. Newton, F. The Mexican American emic system of mental illness: an exploratory study. In J. M. Casas & S. E. Keefe (Eds.),Family and mental health in the Mexican American community. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 7, 1978.Google Scholar
  68. Olmedo, E. L., & Lecca, P.The special populations sub-task panel on mental health of Hispanic Americans. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, 1978.Google Scholar
  69. Olmedo, E. L., & Lopez, S. Summary analysis and recommendations. In E. L. Olmedo & S. Lopez (Eds.),Hispanic mental health professionals. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 5, 1977.Google Scholar
  70. Omedo, E. L., & Padilla, A. M. Empirical and construct validation of a measure of acculturation for Mexican Americans.Journal of Social Psychology, 1978,105, 179–187.Google Scholar
  71. Padilla, A. M., & Olmedo, E. L. Introduction. In A. M. Padilla, E. L. Olmedo, S. Lopez, & R. Perez (Eds.),Hispanic mental health bibliography II. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Monograph No. 6, 1978.Google Scholar
  72. Padilla, A., Padilla, E., Morales, A., Olmedo, S., & Ramirez, R.Inhalent, marijuana, and alcohol abuse among barrio children and adolescents. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Occasional Paper No. 4, 1977.Google Scholar
  73. Padilla, A. M., & Ruiz, R. A.Latino mental health: A review of literature. Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Mental Health, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1973.Google Scholar
  74. Paine, H. J. Attitudes and patterns of alcohol use among Mexican Americans.Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 1977,38, 544–553.Google Scholar
  75. Philippus, M. J. Successful and unsuccessful approaches to mental health services for an urban Hispano American population.Journal of Public Health, 1971,61, 820–830.Google Scholar
  76. Pokorny, A. D., & Frazier, S.Report of the administrative survey of Texas state mental hospitals, 1966. Austin: Texas Department of Mental Health/Retardation, 1966.Google Scholar
  77. Pokorny, A. D., & Overall, J. E. Relationship of psychopathology to age, sex, ethnictiy, education, and marital status in state hospital patients.Journal of Psychiatric Research, 1970,7, 143–152.Google Scholar
  78. Rubel, A. J. Concepts of disease in Mexican-American culture.American Anthropologist, 1960,62, 795–814.Google Scholar
  79. Rubel, A. J.Across the tracks: Mexican-Americans in a Texas city. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1966.Google Scholar
  80. Ruiz, R. A., Casas, J. M., & Padilla, A. M.Culturally relevant behavioristic counseling. Los Angeles: Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center, UCLA, Occasional Paper No. 5, 1977.Google Scholar
  81. Saunders, L.Cultural differences and medical care: The case of the Spanish-speaking people of the Southwest. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1954.Google Scholar
  82. Schensul, S. L. Skills needed in action anthropology: Lessons from El Centro de la Causa.Human Organization, 1974,33, 203–209.Google Scholar
  83. Schulman, S. Rural healthways in New Mexico.Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1960,84, 950–958.Google Scholar
  84. Serrano, A. C., & Gibson, G. Mental health services to the Mexican-American community in San Antonio, Texas.American Journal of Public Health, 1973,63, 1055–1057.Google Scholar
  85. Sue, S. Community mental health services to minority groups: Some optimism, some pessimism.American Psychologist, 1977,32, 616–624.Google Scholar
  86. Teske, R. H. C., Jr., & Nelson, B. H. An analysis of differential assimilation rates among middle-class Mexican Americans.Sociological Quarterly, 1976,17, 218–235.Google Scholar
  87. Thurston, R. G.Urbanization and sociocultural change in a Mexican American enclave. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles, 1957.Google Scholar
  88. Torrey, E. F. The case for the indigenous therapist.Archives of General Psychiatry, 1969,20, 365–373.Google Scholar
  89. Torrey, E. F. The irrelevancy of traditional mental health services for urban Mexican-Americans.American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 1970,40, 240–241.Google Scholar
  90. Torrey, E. F.The mind game: Witchdoctors and psychiatrists. New York: Emerson Hall, 1972.Google Scholar
  91. Trevino, F. M., & Bruhn, J. G. Incidence of mental illness in a Mexican American community.Psychiatric Annals, 1977,7, 33–51.Google Scholar
  92. Tuck, R.Not with the fist: Mexican-Americans in a southwest city. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1946.Google Scholar
  93. Warner, R. Witchcraft and soul loss: Implications for community psychiatry.Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 1977,28, 686–690.Google Scholar
  94. Warren, R. L. Mental health planning and model cities: “Hamlet” or “Hellzapoppin.”Community Mental Health Journal, 1971,7, 39–49.Google Scholar
  95. Weaver, J. L. Mexican American health care behavior: A critical review of the literature.Social Science Quarterly, 1973,54, 82–102.Google Scholar
  96. Weaver, T. Use of hypothetical situations in a study of Spanish American illness referral systems.Human Organization, 1970,29, 140–154.Google Scholar
  97. Welch, S., Comer, J., & Steinman, M. Some social and attitudinal correlates of health care among Mexican Americans.Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 1973,14, 205–213.Google Scholar
  98. Wignall, C. M., & Kopping, L. L. Mexican-American usage of state mental hospital facilities.Community Mental Health Journal, 1967,3, 137–148.Google Scholar
  99. Yamamoto, J., James, Q. C., & Palley, N. Cultural problems in psychiatric therapy.Archives of General Psychiatry, 1968,19, 45–49.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan E. Keefe
    • 1
  • J. Manuel Casas
    • 2
  1. 1.Appalachian State UniversityBooneUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaSanta Barbara

Personalised recommendations