American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 253–284 | Cite as

The 1979 division 27 award for distinguished contributions to community psychology and community mental health: Emory L. Cowen

  • Emory L. Cowen
  • Jack M. Chinsky
  • Julian Rappaport
Article

Summary

The metaphor of the paper's title offers a framework for a brief summary. Effective wooing of primary prevention requires that we take seriously, and adhere to, its clear, sensible defining guidelines; systematize, and further develop, its generative base; use that base to guide the formulation of new primary prevention programs; further develop frameworks to promote informed choices of programs derecions from among many attractive possibilities; and be more hard-nosed as program evaluators. That type of courtship should improve our love life with — and perhaps even, science of — primary prevention in mental health.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emory L. Cowen
    • 1
  • Jack M. Chinsky
  • Julian Rappaport
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of RochesterRochester

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