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American Journal of Community Psychology

, Volume 11, Issue 4, pp 423–439 | Cite as

Social network interactions: A buffer or a stress

  • Joan Fiore
  • Joseph Becker
  • David B. Coppel
Article

Keywords

Social Network Social Psychology Health Psychology Network Interaction Social Network Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joan Fiore
    • 1
  • Joseph Becker
    • 1
  • David B. Coppel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of WashingtonSeattle

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