Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 139–147 | Cite as

Rhetorical theory and family therapy practice

  • Dale E. Bertram
  • David Hale
  • Carl Van Frusha
Family Therapy Practice

Abstract

The study found that a connection exists between rhetoric and therapy because both fields are interested in using language as a tool for generating change. Persuasion is viewed as inherent in human communication, even though people do not necessarily intentionally attempt to persuade others. Following a brief (but detailed) explanation of the theoretical stance which informs the implementation of rhetorical techniques in therapy, three pragmatic exemplars are offered to demonstrate the employment of two classical rhetorical concepts, the parastasis catalogue and syncrisis.

Keywords

Health Psychology Social Issue Family Therapy Human Communication Therapy Practice 

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References

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale E. Bertram
    • 1
  • David Hale
    • 2
  • Carl Van Frusha
    • 2
  1. 1.Nova University's Family Therapy AssociatesUSA
  2. 2.Nova UniversityUSA

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