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Contemporary Family Therapy

, Volume 15, Issue 5, pp 369–380 | Cite as

SYMLOG: Clinical technology for therapist family of origin and family system appraisal

  • Tony D. Crespi
Education, Training, and Credentialing

Abstract

SYMLOG, an acronym for Systematic Multiple Level Observation of Groups, reflects a technology for the quantification and graphic organization of subjective observational data. The SYMLOG field diagram-a graphic diagram which reflects relational interactions on three dimensions-provides the opportunity to analyze the admixture of therapist family of origin dynamics in conjunction with family relational behaviors. This article presents a sample SYMLOG clinician family of origin evaluation with accompanying elaboration surrounding SYMLOG field theory.

Keywords

Field Theory Health Psychology Observational Data Social Issue Multiple Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony D. Crespi
    • 1
  1. 1.Meriden

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