Human Ecology

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 131–162 | Cite as

Prehispanic colonization of the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico

  • Linda Nicholas
  • Gary Feinman
  • Stephen A. Kowalewski
  • Richard E. Blanton
  • Laura Finsten
Article

Abstract

A decade ago in a seminal monograph, Anne Kirkby proposed a model of colonization for the prehispanic Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, in which settlement location was determined by the distribution of prime agricultural land. The model was tested against the corpus of known prehispanic settlements and tentative support was found. In the years since this study, a systematic archeological settlement pattern project was completed, making a more adequate test of the model possible. Reexamination of the colonization process suggests that, although agricultural considerations were important, they were less determinant of settlement location than had been implied previously. The adoption of a broader perspective toward regional colonization is suggested.

Key words

colonization settlement pattern Oaxaca Mexico 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda Nicholas
    • 1
  • Gary Feinman
    • 1
  • Stephen A. Kowalewski
    • 2
  • Richard E. Blanton
    • 3
  • Laura Finsten
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthens
  3. 3.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyPurdue UniversityWest Lafayette
  4. 4.Department of AnthropologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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