Human Ecology

, Volume 6, Issue 2, pp 165–177 | Cite as

Projections of world population and world food supply

  • Roy E. Licklider
Article
  • 34 Downloads

Abstract

This paper considers projections made about world population levels and world food production from 1945 to 1970, attempting to evaluate them in terms of actual levels of 1975. Most underestimated the population explosion of the past two decades; short-term estimates were more reliable than long-term ones; there was little variation in population estimates at any one time; and U. N. figures were generally the most useful. Projections of world food production were less satisfactory than those of population levels, as both data and measures were debatable. The research suggests some of the problems in evaluating the danger of world famine by examining projections of population and food supply mechanically and in isolation from the complex processes which affect these factors.

Key words

demographic projections world food supply grain production famine predictions 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy E. Licklider
    • 1
  1. 1.Exxon Education Foundation and Douglass CollegeRutgers UniversityNew Brunswick

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