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Women's fishing in Oceania

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Abstract

Women's fishing in Oceania has been overlooked in most subsistence studies in the region and, as a consequence, there are few quantitative data available upon which to base an assessment of its importance. However, in the present study, the few data available on women's fishing in Oceania are examined, and these show that women contribute significantly to marine food yields in the region. Also, it is suggested that the highly regular nature of women's fishing makes women more reliable, and therefore more effective than men as suppliers of protein for subsistence. The implications of these findings for future development policies in the region are then discussed.

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Chapman, M.D. Women's fishing in Oceania. Hum Ecol 15, 267–288 (1987). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF00888026

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