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The future use of refrigeration in British coal mines

  • J. M. Anderson
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Summary

This paper examines the methods presently available to apply refrigeration to a longwall district of a coal mine with particular reference to both the sources of heat and humidity around a district, and the specific locations which require cooling. Other methods to improve climatic conditions are also investigated and computer-predicted results from a district temperature prediction program are used for discussion.

An approach to the solution of a climatic problem is explained with reference to other coal mine contaminants and an environmental design philosophy for deep high production districts in British coal mines is described.

Keywords

Longwall mining heat sources refrigeration cooling strategy 

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Anderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mining and Metallurgical EngineeringUniversity of QueenslandSt. LuciaAustralia

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