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pure and applied geophysics

, Volume 77, Issue 1, pp 193–200 | Cite as

A meridional surface wind speed profile in MacRobertson Land, Antarctica

  • Gunter E. Weller
Article

Summary

A surface wind vector profile along the 62° East meridian in Antarctica is constructed from field observations extending from 600 kilometers inland to 16 kilometers offshore. The theory of gravity winds proposed byF. K. Ball is used successfully to explain this profile.

Keywords

Wind Speed Field Observation Surface Wind Wind Vector Surface Wind Speed 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunter E. Weller
    • 1
  1. 1.Geophysical InstituteUniversity of AlaskaCollege

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