Theoretical and Applied Climatology

, Volume 51, Issue 1–2, pp 67–74 | Cite as

Estimation of probable maximum precipitation for catchments in eastern India by a generalized method

  • P. R. Rakhecha
  • B. N. Mandal
  • A. K. Kulkarni
  • N. R. Deshpande
Article

Summary

A generalized method to estimate the probable maximum precipitation (PMP) has been developed for catchments in eastern India (80° E, 18° N) by pooling together all the major rainstorms that have occurred in this area. The areal raindepths of these storms are normalized for factors such as storm dew point temperature, distance of the storm from the coast, topographic effects and any intervening mountain barriers between the storm area and the moisture source. The normalized values are then applied, with appropriate adjustment factors in estimating PMP raindepths, to the Subarnarekha river catchment (upto the Chandil dam site) with an area of 5663 km2. The PMP rainfall for 1, 2 and 3 days were found to be roughly 53 cm, 78 cm and 98 cm, respectively. It is expected that the application of the generalized method proposed here will give more reliable estimates of PMP for different duration rainfall events.

Keywords

India Waste Water Water Pollution Rainfall Event Reliable Estimate 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. R. Rakhecha
    • 1
  • B. N. Mandal
    • 1
  • A. K. Kulkarni
    • 1
  • N. R. Deshpande
    • 1
  1. 1.Indian Institute of Tropical MeteorologyPuneIndia

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