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Journal of Fluorescence

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 249–265 | Cite as

Flow cytometric discrimination of phytoplankton classes by fluorescence emission and excitation properties

  • J. W. Hofstraat
  • M. E. J. de Vreeze
  • W. J. M. van Zeijl
  • L. Peperzak
  • J. C. H. Peeters
  • H. W. Balfoort
Article

Abstract

The ataxonomic discrimination of phytoplankton species on the basis of fluorescence data obtained by multiwavelength excitation in combination with wavelength selective detection in flow cytometry is demonstrated. The discrimination is based on differences in pigment composition between the species, which are reflected in their spectral characteristics. Classification can be done both by making use of the absolute fluorescence intensities and with fluorescence parameter ratios. The latter approach has the advantage that size-related effects and instrument fluctuations are reduced to a large extent. Photoadaptation does influence the absolute as well as the ratioed parameters that are obtained but does not impede the classification into major ataxonomic groups.

Key Words

Flow cytometry in vivo fluorescence spectra photoadaptation phytoplankton classification 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Hofstraat
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. E. J. de Vreeze
    • 1
  • W. J. M. van Zeijl
    • 1
  • L. Peperzak
    • 1
  • J. C. H. Peeters
    • 1
  • H. W. Balfoort
    • 3
  1. 1.Tidal Waters DivisionMinistry of Transport and Public WorksThe HagueThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Corporate Research LaboratoryAKZO Research Laboratories ArnhemArnhemThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Aquatic Ecology DepartmentUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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