Pediatric Nephrology

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 621–622 | Cite as

Non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma complicating steroid treatment in childhood nephrosis

  • Ji-yun Yang
  • Xiao-lin Cui
  • Xiao-ju He
Brief Report

Abstract

Two nephrotic children treated with prednisone developed steroid-induced diabetes and non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma (NKHC). Both patients presented with convulsions, coma and shock. The glucose concentration of the cerebrospinal fluid was 425 mg/dl and 622 mg/dl, respectively. Both patients had no diabetic family history, but had been treated with prednisone for 4 and 8 months, receiving total doses of 6.6 and 10.8 g, respectively. Despite conventional therapy, both patients deteriorated rapidly and died several hours later. Steroid-induced diabetes associated with NKHC is a rare but serious complication of steroid therapy.

Key words

Steroid-induced diabetes Non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma Nephrotic syndrome 

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Copyright information

© IPNA 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ji-yun Yang
    • 1
  • Xiao-lin Cui
    • 1
  • Xiao-ju He
    • 1
  1. 1.Paediatric DepartmentFirst Teaching Hospital of Beijing Medical UniversityBeijingChina

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