Artificial Intelligence Review

, Volume 7, Issue 6, pp 421–443 | Cite as

Inheritance systems with exceptions

  • M. Magnan
  • C. Oussalah
Article
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper, we are interested in the representation and management of multiple inheritance systems with exceptions in both semantic networks and object-oriented languages. Exception management raises different problems, particularly in the presence of contradictions. Three types of contradictions, which constitute the problematics of exception management, may be identified. The different methods used to solve these contradictions are presented; two approaches in particular are underscored: a logic approach and an algebraic approach.

Key Words

exceptions default logic shortest-path algorithm on-path/off-path preemption credulous/skeptical reasoning object-object exceptions object-property exceptions 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Magnan
    • 1
  • C. Oussalah
    • 1
  1. 1.L.E.R.I. Parc Scientifique Georges BesseNîmesFrance

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