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Artificial Intelligence Review

, Volume 9, Issue 6, pp 387–422 | Cite as

Learning, goals, and learning goals: A perspective on goal-driven learning

  • David B. Leake
  • Ashwin Ram
Article

Abstract

In cognitive science, artificial intelligence, psychology, and education, a growing body of research supports the view that the learning process is strongly influenced by the learner's goals. The fundamental tenet ofgoal-driven learning is that learning is largely an active and strategic process in which the learner, human or machine, attempts to identify and satisfy its information needs in the context of its tasks and goals, its prior knowledge, its capabilities, and environmental opportunities for learning. This article examines the motivations for adopting a goal-driven model of learning, the relationship between task goals and learning goals, the influences goals can have on learning, and the pragmatic implications of the goal-driven learning model. It presents a new integrative framework for understanding the goal-driven learning process and applies this framework to characterizing research on goal-driven learning.

Key words

machine learning cognitive modeling metacognition active learning multistrategy learning utility of learning 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David B. Leake
    • 1
  • Ashwin Ram
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.College of ComputingGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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