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Wilhelm Roux's archives of developmental biology

, Volume 189, Issue 1, pp 17–24 | Cite as

Characterization by isoelectric focusing of chorion protein variants inDrosophila melanogaster and their use in developmental and linkage analysis

  • Claudine Zighera Yannoni
  • William H. Petri
Article

Summary

Drosophila melanogaster chorion proteins are characterized on one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IF) gels. The six major chorion components previously identified on SDS gels are shown to resolve into at least 11 components in our IF system. IF screening of 102 geographic strains ofDrosophila melanogaster revealed seven cases of variation in major chorion components. Two strains, Crimea and Falsterbo, which were monomorphic for a variant B1 protein and two strains, Skafto and Lausanne, which were monomorphic for a variant C1 protein, were chosen for further study. After IF developmental analysis of F1 hybrids had indicated that the sources of the variation resided in the structural genes for these proteins, each variant was crossed to a multiply marked and inverted strain (BLT) to determine the linkage group of the variant gene. To localize genes to more specific sites multiply marked 3rd (SKERO) or X-chromosomal (CB1) (X-PLE) mapping strains were used. In both Crimea and Falsterbo the gene for the B1 protein is located near map location 26 on the 3rd chromosome. In both Lausanne and Skafto the C1 gene is located on the X chromosome. Hence, for the first time, we have demonstrated genetically the non-linkage of two chorion genes, B1 and C1.

Key words

Drosophila Geographic strains Chorion proteins Electrophoretic variants Chorion gene linkage 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudine Zighera Yannoni
    • 1
  • William H. Petri
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA

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