Advertisement

Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 141–161 | Cite as

Tailored media can enhance the success of smoking cessation clinics

  • R. Peter Mogielnicki
  • Scott Neslin
  • Jennie Dulac
  • Dominic Balestra
  • Edward Gillie
  • John Corson
Article

Abstract

Smokers recruited through the medical outpatient clinics of two similar Veterans Hospitals over two successive years participated in a smoking cessation study which randomized them between a group assigned to behavior modification clinics and a group receiving a packet of smoking cessation material in the mail. Following the second year's clinics at the site of one of the two hospitals, an intensive media campaign, based on the content of the behavior modification program, was targeted at the study population over commercial television and radio. The six-month abstinence rate for clinic participants measured by self-report, serum thiocyanate and exhaled air carbon monoxide was 36.8 % in the group assigned to clinic followed by media, 20.2% in the group assigned to clinic alone, and 10.6% in the group receiving materials in the mail. The difference in cessation rates between the clinic participants who were and those who were not exposed to the media following their clinics was significant at the 0.05 significance level (χ2=3.9, 1 d.f). Logistic analysis confirmed the benefit of the media campaign.

Key words

smoking media cigarette behavior modification 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aaker, D., and Myers, J. (1982).Advertising Management, 2nd ed., Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J.Google Scholar
  2. Bernstein, D., and McAlister, A. (1976). The modification of smoking behavior: Progress and problems.Addict. Behav. 1: 899–102.Google Scholar
  3. Best, J., and Hadstian, A. (1978). A situation-specific model for smoking behavior.Addict. Behav. 3: 79–92.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Best, J., Owen, L., and Trentadue, L. (1978). Comparison of satiation and rapid smoking in self-managed smoking cessation.Addict. Behav. 3: 71–78.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. BNDP Statistical Software (1981). University of California Press, Berkeley.Google Scholar
  6. Bradstock, K., Marks, J., Forman, M., Gentry, E., Hogelin, G., and Trowbridge, F. (1984). Behavioral risk factor surveillance 1981–1983.Morbid. Mortal. Week. Rep. CDC Surveill. Surv. 33: 155.Google Scholar
  7. Butts, W., Kucheneman, M., and Widdowson, G. (1974). Automated method for determining serum thiocyanate to distinguish smokers from non-smokers.Clin. Chem. 20: 1344.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Farquhar, J., Wood, P., Breitrose, H., Haskett, W., Meyer, A., Maccoby, N., Alexander, J., Brown, B., McAlister, A., Nash, J., and Stern, M. (1977). Community education for cardiovascular health.Lancet 1: 1191–1195.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Fishbein, M. (1982). In Eiser, J. R. (ed.),Social Psychology and Behavioral Medicine, John Wiley and Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  10. Fishbein, M., and Ajzen, I. (1975).Belief, Attitude, Intention and Behavior: An Introduction to Theory and Research, Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass.Google Scholar
  11. Flay, B., and Sobel, J. (1983). The role of mass media in preventing adolescent substance abuse. In Glynn, T., Leukefeld, C., and Ludford, I. (eds.),Preventing Adolescent Drug Abuse: Intervention Strategies. NIDA Monograph 47, A Raus Review Report.Google Scholar
  12. Flay, B., d'Avernas, J., Best, J., Kersell, M., and Ryan, K. (1983). Cigarette smoking: Why young people do it and ways of preventing it. In McGrath, P., and Firestone, P. (eds.),Pediatric and Adolescent Behavioral Medicine: Issues in Treatment, Springer, New York.Google Scholar
  13. Flay, B., Johnson, C., Hansen, W., Ulene, A., Grossman, L., Alvarez, L., Sobel, D., Hoch-stein, G., and Sobel, J. (1982). In Baggley, J., and Janega, P. (eds.),Experimental Research in TV Instruction, Vol. 5, Concordia University, Montreal.Google Scholar
  14. Gronhaug, K., and Kangun, N. (1979). Exploring generalized and personalized beliefs among smokers and non-smokers: A first look. In Wilkie, W., (ed.),Advances in Consumer Research, Vol. 6, Association for Consumer Research.Google Scholar
  15. Hamburg, D., Elliott, G., and Parron, D. (eds.) (1982).Frontiers of Research in the Biobehavioral Sciences, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  16. Hamilton, J. (1972). The demand for cigarettes: Advertising, the health scene, and the cigarette advertising ban.Rev. Econ. Stat. 54: 405–411.Google Scholar
  17. Henningfield, J., Stitzer, M., and Griffiths, R. (1980). Expired air carbon monoxide accumulation and elimination as a function of number of cigarettes smoked.Addict. Behav. 5: 265–272.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Hunt, W., Barnett, L., and Branch, L. (1971). Relapse rates in addiction programs.J. Clin. Psychol. 27: 455–456.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Ippolito, R., Murphy, R., and Donald, S. (1979).Staff Report on Consumer Responses to Cigarette Health Information, Federal Trade Commission: Bureau of Economics.Google Scholar
  20. Jaffe, J., and Jarvik, M. (1978). Tobacco use and tobacco use disorder. In Lipton, M., DiMascia, A., and Killan, K. (eds.),Psychopharmacology: A Generation of Progress, Raven Press, New York.Google Scholar
  21. Levenberg, S., and Wagner, M. (1976). Smoking cessation: Long-term irrelevance of mode of treatment.J. Behav. Ther. Exp. Psychiat. 7: 93–95.Google Scholar
  22. Lipton, M., DiMascia, A., and Killan, K. (eds.) (1978).Psychopharmacology: A Generation of Progress, Raven Press, New York.Google Scholar
  23. Mausner, B., and Platt, E. (1971).Smoking: A Behavioral Analysis, Pergamon Press, New York.Google Scholar
  24. Miller, L., Schilling, A., Logan, D., and Johnson, R. (1977). Potential hazards of rapid smoking as a technique for the modification of smoking behavior.N. Engl. J. Med. 297: 590–592.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Muscatel, K. (1979).The Relation of Attitudinal Factors to the Decision to Stop Smoking, Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle.Google Scholar
  26. Ray, M. (1973). A decision sequence analysis of developments in marketing communication.J. Market. 37: 29–38.Google Scholar
  27. Report by a Subcommittee of the Research Committee of the British Thoracic Society (1983). Comparison of four methods of smoking withdrawal in patients with smoking related diseases (1983).Br. Med. J. 19: 595–597.Google Scholar
  28. Russell, M., Wilson, C., Taylor, C., and Baker, C. (1979). Effect of general practioners' advice to stop smoking.Br. Med. J. 28: 231–235.Google Scholar
  29. Schwartz, J. (1980). The multistep process of stopping smoking-The multitude intervention needs. InWorld Conference on Smoking and Health (Fourth), Almquist and Wiksell, Stockholm.Google Scholar
  30. Schwartz, J., and Rider, G. (1978).Review and Evaluation of Smoking Control Methods: 1976 Update, National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health, Bureau of Health Education, Center for Disease Control, U.S. Public Health Service.Google Scholar
  31. Teel, S., Teel, J., and Bearden, W. (1979). Lessons learned from the broadcast cigarette advertising ban.J. Market. 43: 45–50.Google Scholar
  32. United States Public Health Service (1975, 1976).Adult Use of Tobacco, National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health, Center for Disease Control, U.S. Public Health Service.Google Scholar
  33. United States Public Health Service (1979).Smoking and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, (PHS) 79-50066, DHEW, Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Peter Mogielnicki
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Scott Neslin
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jennie Dulac
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Dominic Balestra
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Edward Gillie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • John Corson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical and Regional Office CenterVermont
  2. 2.Veterans Administration HospitalManchester
  3. 3.Dartmouth Medical SchoolHanover
  4. 4.Amos Tuck School of Business AdministrationHanover

Personalised recommendations