Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 103–116 | Cite as

The relationship of anger expression to health problems among black americans in a national survey

  • Ernest H. Johnson
  • Clifford L. Broman
Article

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between anger expression, other psychosocial measures, and health problems in a nationally representative, cross-sectional sample of 1277 black adults. Subjects indicating a high level of outwardly expressed anger during a period in which they experienced a severe personal problem had a significantly higher number of health problems than their counterparts who expressed low and moderate levels of anger. Anger expression also significantly interacted with a measure of life strain (employment status) to predict health problems. Blacks who were unemployed were more likely to have a higher number of health problems if anger was expressed outwardly at a high level. The relationship was found to be independent of age, gender, urbanicity, smoking, and drinking problems. The overall pattern of the findings suggests that blacks who are at increased risk for health problems may be identified by how often anger is experienced and expressed during periods of emotional distress.

Key words

anger expression health life strain black Americans 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest H. Johnson
    • 1
  • Clifford L. Broman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of MichiganAnn Arbor
  2. 2.Department of SociologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing

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