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Child's Nervous System

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 121–123 | Cite as

Neonatal diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis

  • L. A. Ramenghi
  • A. Verrotti
  • S. Domizio
  • C. Di Rocco
  • G. Morgese
  • G. Sabatino
Case Report

Abstract

Intracranial tumors are rare in the neonatal period, and generally the most common histological types are astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, choroid plexus papilloma and neuroectodermal tumors. The early diagnosis of these tumors is often very difficult. The authors report a case of a full-term newborn who presented with opisthotonus. A subependymal mass was detected by cerebral ultrasonography, and when the child was 1 month of age depigmentations appeared on the trunk and on the right leg, confirming the suspicion of tuberous sclerosis. At 3 months of age the child suffered infantile spasm with hypsarrhythmia. The developmental delay, the marked progressive neurological deterioration and the daily seizures suggested surgical resection. Histologic studies showed a subependymal giant cell astrocytoma such as typically occurs in tuberous sclerosis.

Key words

Tuberous sclerosis Subependymal giant cell Astrocytoma Newborn 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. A. Ramenghi
    • 1
  • A. Verrotti
    • 2
  • S. Domizio
    • 1
  • C. Di Rocco
    • 3
  • G. Morgese
    • 2
  • G. Sabatino
    • 1
  1. 1.Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Ospedale PediatricoUniversity of ChietiChietiItaly
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsUniversity of ChietiChietiItaly
  3. 3.Section of Pediatric NeurosurgeryCatholic University Medical SchoolRomeItaly

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