Administration in mental health

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 174–183 | Cite as

Stress and burnout among superintendents of public residential facilities

  • Gary V. Sluyter
Article
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Abstract

While the phenomenon of “burnout” has received increased attention by human services professionals, no studies have been reported which examine burnout levels and coping strategies of superintendents of public residential facilities for mentally retarded persons. The present study was designed to investigate several research questions in that area with a random sample of 162 residential facility directors. Results indicated that the mean overall burnout scores tend to be lower than those reported in the literature for other human service employees. Also, superintendents tend to favor the use of Direct/Active strategies for coping with stressors. Implications for burnout prevention and further research are discussed.

Keywords

Public Health Research Question Random Sample Coping Strategy Human Service 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary V. Sluyter

There are no affiliations available

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