Soviet Physics Journal

, Volume 8, Issue 6, pp 99–102 | Cite as

The dislocation structure of alloyed contacts between metals and semiconductors

  • U. M. Kulish
  • A. P. Vyatkin
Article
  • 14 Downloads

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    It has been shown that the preparation of alloyed contacts between a semiconductor and a metal at temperatures above that at which the former becomes plastic leads to a sharp increase in dislocation density in the region of the contact area of the semiconductor.

     
  2. 2.

    Rapid cooling of the alloyed contact during its preparation (200 °–300 °/min) leads to the formation of a “dislocation ring” around it, which contributes to the appearance of cracks in the contact.

     
  3. 3.

    Slow cooling of the alloyed contact (about 30 °/min) from an alloying temperature exceeding that at which the semiconductor becomes plastic produces strong distortion of the semiconductor's structure. The dislocation density reaches a maximum at the contact boundary (about 108 cm−2) and then gradually falls away on passing from the contact to the crystal periphery.

     
  4. 4.

    During cooling of the alloyed contacts, dislocations are also formed in the recrystallized layer. The higher the alloying temperature and the cooling rate of the contact, the greater is the dislocation density in the recrystallized layer.

     
  5. 5.

    Some ways of making alloyed contacts between semiconductors and metals that prevent the development of high dislocation densities in the contact region of the semiconductor are indicated.

     

Keywords

Contact Area Dislocation Density Sharp Increase Cooling Rate Slow Cool 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Faraday Press, Inc. 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. M. Kulish
    • 1
  • A. P. Vyatkin
    • 1
  1. 1.Kuznetsov Siberian Institute of Technical PhysicsUSSR

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