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Biometals

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 221–228 | Cite as

The bioavailability of26Al-labelled aluminium citrate and aluminium hydroxide in volunteers

  • N. D. Priest
  • R. J. Talbot
  • J. G. Austin
  • J. P. Day
  • S. J. King
  • K. Fifield
  • R. G. Cresswell
Research Papers

Abstract

A study was undertaken to determine the fraction of ingested aluminium taken up by two male volunteers, following their ingestion of either aluminium citrate or aluminium hydroxide. In addition, the effects of simultaneous citrate ingestion on the gastrointestinal absorption of aluminium from its hydroxide was studied. Volunteers received three oral doses of26Al-labelled aluminium compound in water. The doses were administered directly into the stomach using a paediatric feeding tube. Blood samples were collected from the volunteers at 1, 4 and 24 h after administration, and their daily output of urine and faeces was collected for 6 days. These samples were analysed for their26Al content using either coincidence gamma-counting or accelerator mass spectrometry. The uptake of aluminium was greatest following its administration in the citrate form and was least following intake as the aluminium hydroxide suspension. The co-administration of citrate, with the aluminium hydroxide suspension, was found to enhance the levels of26Al uptake in both volunteers. Using a urinary excretion factor based on the results of previous studies, the fractional aluminium uptake from each of the species was calculated: aluminium citrate, 5.23 × 10−3; aluminium hydroxide, 1.04 × 10−4; aluminium hydroxide with citrate, 1.36 × 10−3.

Keywords

aluminium citrate aluminium hydroxide bioavailability ingestion 

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Copyright information

© Rapid Science Publishers Ltd 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. D. Priest
    • 1
  • R. J. Talbot
    • 1
  • J. G. Austin
    • 1
  • J. P. Day
    • 2
  • S. J. King
    • 2
  • K. Fifield
    • 3
  • R. G. Cresswell
    • 3
  1. 1.Biomedical Research, AEA TechnologyHarwellUK
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryUniversity of ManchesterManchesterUK
  3. 3.Department of Nuclear PhysicsAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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