Role of thyroid hormones in regulation of genetic activity of normal and transformed human cells

  • A. Abdukarimov
  • D. M. Shamsieva
  • S. E. Muchnik
  • A. A. Aripdzhanov
  • D. Kh. Khamidov
Experimental Genetics
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

Thyroid hormones labeled with125I are localized on structures of the interphase nucleus and metaphase chromosomes of fibroblasts from 8–10-week human embryos in culture. Meanwhile, although labeled thyroid hormones are present in interphase nuclei of HeLa cells, by contrast with normal cells they are not accepted by their metaphase chromosomes. It is suggested on the basis of the results that the acceptor region of the genome of HeLa cells during transformation have lost their ability to bind their own receptor complexes with thyroid hormones.

Key Words

thyroid hormones metaphase chromosomes interphase nucleus sitespecific region receptor triiodothyronine 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Abdukarimov
  • D. M. Shamsieva
  • S. E. Muchnik
  • A. A. Aripdzhanov
  • D. Kh. Khamidov

There are no affiliations available

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