Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 87, Issue 3, pp 267–270 | Cite as

Metabolism of lipid peroxides during chemical carcinogenesis

  • V. Z. Lankin
  • V. M. Polyakov
  • A. V. Arkhangel'skaya
  • S. M. Gurevich
Oncology

Abstract

The content of lecithins and cephalins and the activity of enzymic and nonenzymic systems of phospholipid peroxidation in the microsomes and mitochondria of the rat liver were sharply changed after injection of 3,4-benzpyrene. Significant changes take place in the content of lipid peroxides and activity of enzymes utilizing lipid peroxides (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase) in the rat liver during carcinogenesis. Accumulation of lipid peroxides in the rat liver during carcinogenesis was shown to be connected with disturbances of balance between the systems generating and detoxicating lipid peroxides. The absence of lipid peroxides in the tumors can be attributed to high activity of protective enzyme systems and it reflects adaptive mechanisms aimed at maintaining a high background of proliferating cells in the tumor.

Key Words

carcinogenesis lipid peroxides phospholipids glutathione peroxidase glutathione reductase 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Z. Lankin
  • V. M. Polyakov
  • A. V. Arkhangel'skaya
  • S. M. Gurevich

There are no affiliations available

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