Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 51–56 | Cite as

Nonselective inhibition of messenger RNA translation by highly purified low molecular weight RNA species from ribosomal salt wash of chick embryonic muscle

  • A. K. Mukherjee
  • S. Sarkar
Article

Abstract

A low molecular weight RNA species, in the 70–90 nucleotide size range (iRNA), has been purified from the ribosomal salt wash of chick embryonic muscle by a combination of DEAE-cellulose and hydroxyapatite chromatography. This method yields iRNA free from contaminating tRNA and gives better and more reproducible yields than those obtained with our previous method involving lengthy dialysis of the salt wash. The iRNA at a concentration of 20–80 ng range strongly inhibits the translation of homologous and heterologous mRNAs i.e. chick muscle poly(A)+mRNA and rabbit globin mRNA; uncapped mRNA; and poly(A)-mRNA in micrococcal nuclease-treated reticulocyte lysate indicating that inhibition by iRNA is nonselective in nature. The translation of endogenous globin mRNA and polysomes in the lysate is strikingly less sensitive to iRNA suggesting that the initiation step is primarily affected by iRNA. The iRNA does not appear to be double-stranded RNA. It is concluded that iRNA is distinct from other low molecular weight RNA species described in the literature which modulate protein synthesis in cell-free systems.

Keywords

Hydroxyapatite Previous Method Reproducible Yield Initiation Step Nonselective Inhibition 

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Copyright information

© Dr W. Junk Publishers 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. K. Mukherjee
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Sarkar
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Muscle ResearchBoston Biomedical Research InstituteBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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