Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 50, Issue 3, pp 895–899 | Cite as

Two types of afferent influence of the mechanoreceptors of the small intestine on the blood pressure

  • N. A. Anikina
Physiology
  • 12 Downloads

Summary

An increased pressure in the intestinal vessels causes an increased discharge from the Pacinian corpuscles and reduces systemic arterial blood pressure. A decrease of pressure in the intestinal vessels reduces the discharge rates from the Pacinian corpuscles and causes a rise of blood pressure. Stretching the intestinal wall stimulates the receptors enclosed in it and increases arterial blood pressure. The relationship between intestinal stimulation and blood pressure depends on the interaction between the discharges from the Pacinian corpuscles and from the receptors of the intestinal wall.

Keywords

Public Health Blood Pressure Small Intestine Discharge Rate Arterial Blood Pressure 

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1961

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. A. Anikina
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Electrophysiology and Laboratory of General Physiology, Institute of Normal and Pathological PhysiologyAMN SSSRMoscow

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