Soviet Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 20, Issue 4, pp 296–302 | Cite as

A methodology for investigating the effectiveness of magnetic-abrasive powders

  • T. Ya. Gridasova
  • A. F. Zhornyak
  • V. E. Oliker
  • V. Ya. Shlyuko
  • V. V. Dushinskii
  • A. P. Kruglyak
Test Methods and Properties of Powder Metallurgical Materials
  • 15 Downloads

Conclusions

The optimal polishing speed in the range covered by our experiments was 3.05 m/sec for both magnetic-abrasive powders and both steels.

The removed mass increases linearly with the increase of oscillation frequency and decrease of linear gap; for the ShKh15 ferromagnetic steel the removed mass is roughly five times that for the nonmagnetic Kh18N10 steel. When held between the electromagnet poles of the magnetic-abrasive polisher, the ferromagnetic steel increases the magnetic flux, the magnetic-abrasive particles are pressed more firmly against the surface, and the shearing forces increase (compared with those on a nonmagnetic material under the same current parameters).

The maximum removal of mass is observed with the Zh15KT composition powder, but the maximum change in surface roughness in the MAP process is attained with the POLIMAM-T1 cast magnetic-abrasive powder, fractions — 01: from ∇7c to ∇12a (for ShKh15 steel) and from ∇8c to ∇10a (for Kh18N10 steel).

A distinctive feature and main advantage of the proposed methodology is that it allows comparing magnetic-abrasive powders of different composition and structure under optimal operating conditions for each powder (and not under constant conditions for a fixed material, as in the traditional methods). It is thus possible to obtain in a single series of experiments a more objective assessment of the effectiveness of several magnetic-abrasive powders for different materials and to find a functional dependence between the MAP optimization parameters, e.g., the mass removed from the part being polished, and the process parameters. The experiments can be completed in a much shorter time, 1/10–1/100 of the time needed for traditional methods (depending on the number of factors studied).

Keywords

Surface Roughness Magnetic Flux Functional Dependence Force Increase Optimal Operating Condition 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature cited

  1. 1.
    F. Yu. Sakulevich and L. M. Kozhura, Bulk Magnetic-Abrasive Treatment [in Russian], Nauka i Tekhnika, Minsk (1978).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    F. Yu. Sakulevich, L. K. Minin, and L. A. Olender, Magnetic-Abrasive Treatment of Precision Parts [in Russian], Vysshaya Shkola, Minsk (1977).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    V. Ya. Shlyuko, T. Ya. Gridasova, L. A. Karpova, A. P. Kruglyak, A. F. Zhornyak, and V. E. Oliker, “Optimizing the conditions of magnetic-abrasive treatment of brass,” Poroshk. Metall., No. 11, 103–106 (1978).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Yu. P. Adler, Introduction to Experimental Design [in Russian], Metallurgiya, Moscow (1969).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    B. Z. Brodskii, Introduction to Factor Experimental Design [in Russian], Nauka, Moscow (1976).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    V. V. Dushinskii, S. G. Radchenko, and E. S. Pukhovskii, Optimization of Technological Processes in Machine Building [in Russian], Tekhnika, Kiev (1977).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    V. D. Yudin, V. N. Filonenko, N. A. Vilkov, and E. A. Itenberg, “A machine for magneticabrasive treatment,” Inventor's Certificate No. 509412, Byull. Izobret., No. 13 (1976).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Ya. Gridasova
    • 1
  • A. F. Zhornyak
    • 1
  • V. E. Oliker
    • 1
  • V. Ya. Shlyuko
    • 1
  • V. V. Dushinskii
    • 1
  • A. P. Kruglyak
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Materials ScienceAcademy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSRUkraine

Personalised recommendations