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Soviet Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 83–87 | Cite as

Cracking resistance and strength of carbide steels

  • Ya. P. Kyubarsepp
  • Kh. I. Annuka
  • Kh. D. Reshetnyak
  • A. L. Maistrenko
  • G. I. Chepovetskii
Investigation Methods and Properties of Powder Materials
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Conclusions

The carbide steels with binders of austenitic or austenitic-martensitic steels have high cracking resistance which is not inferior to that of the tungsten carbide hard alloys (at the same volume content of the metallic phase). This can be explained by high ductility of the binder of these materials.

There is a relationship between cracking resistance and certain properties of the carbide steels, such as hardness, proof stress, and the limiting plastic strain in compression: a reduction of HV, σ0.1, and an increase of ɛ1 are accompanied by an increase of K1c. Consequently, it is possible to evaluate the cracking resistance on the basis of these available and relatively easy to determine mechanical properties.

Keywords

Mechanical Property Carbide Tungsten Ductility Plastic Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ya. P. Kyubarsepp
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kh. I. Annuka
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Kh. D. Reshetnyak
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. L. Maistrenko
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. I. Chepovetskii
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Tallin Polytechnical InstituteUSSR
  2. 2.Institute of Superhard MaterialsAcademy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSRKiev
  3. 3.Tallin Electrotechnical Plant Production OrganizationUSSR

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