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Soviet Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 22, Issue 6, pp 500–506 | Cite as

Chart of fracture mechanisms of tungsten

  • Yu. V. Mil'man
  • I. V. Gridneva
  • N. P. Korzhova
  • S. I. Chugunova
  • V. K. Ushakov
  • B. I. Ol'shanskii
  • A. B. Ol'shanskii
Test Methods and Properties of Powder Metallurgical Materials

Conclusions

On the basis of results of our own and other authors' investigations into the variation of the strength of tungsten with temperature, a chart of fracture mechanisms of tungsten is proposed, which differs from the chart published in [1] in that it has two additional regions with characteristic mechanisms of fracture: partially tough fracture and tough fracture along grain boundaries. The concept of partially tough fracture is introduced, which is observed in a wide range of operating temperatures. The desirability is demonstrated of determining two upper cold-brittleness temperatures — T br u1 , which corresponds to a transition from quasibrittle to partially tough fracture, and T br u2 , representing a transition from partially tough to tough fracture. The positions of the cold-brittleness temperatures have been indicated on the chart of fracture mechanisms. It shows that the scientific classification of fracture mechanisms proposed in [2] makes it possible to analyze the effect of temperature on the mechanism of fracture and mechanical properties of tungsten and provides a convenient basis for the construction of a chart of fracture mechanisms.

Keywords

Mechanical Property Tungsten Fracture Mechanism Operating Temperature Characteristic Mechanism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu. V. Mil'man
    • 1
  • I. V. Gridneva
    • 1
  • N. P. Korzhova
    • 1
  • S. I. Chugunova
    • 1
  • V. K. Ushakov
    • 1
  • B. I. Ol'shanskii
    • 1
  • A. B. Ol'shanskii
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Materials ScienceAcademy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSRUkraine

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