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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 16, Issue 1, pp 27–31 | Cite as

Effects of the components of Newcastle disease virus on the structural order of lipid assemblies

  • Vassil Z. Neitchev
  • Lubka P. Dumanova
Articles

Abstract

The membrane M-protein of Newcastle disease virus is localized directly beneath the lipid bilayer. Although this protein is the major constituent of the virus, its structural relationship to the lipid or to the other viral component hemagglutininneuraminidase, the so called HN-glycoprotein, is still unknown. The effects of either M-protein alone or both M-protein and HN-glycoprotein on the lipid assemblies in reconstituted liposomes were determined by differential polarized phase fluorometry, steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and emission lifetime measurements.

It is demonstrated that the degree of rotation of fluorophores in reconstituted liposomes is restricted by the molecular packing of lipids in the bilayer and this in turn can be correlated with the structural order of the lipids in the membrane. The experimental results show that the structural order parameters calculated from the fluorescence measurements are strongly influenced by the presence of both M-protein and HN-glycoprotein in the lipid assemblies.

Key words

fluorescence study HN-glycoprotein lipid assemblies M-protein structural order virus 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vassil Z. Neitchev
    • 1
  • Lubka P. Dumanova
    • 2
  1. 1.Central Laboratory of BiophysicsBulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Central Veterinary Research InstituteSofiaBulgaria

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