Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 48, Issue 5, pp 1320–1325 | Cite as

Human postural movements in increased and reduced gravitational fields

  • V. S. Gurfinkel'
  • P. K. Isakov
  • V. B. Malkin
  • V. I. Popov
Physiology
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Summary

Coordination of position and movements in man was studied under conditions of alternating short periods of increased and decreased gravitation. Investigations were held in the elevator of Moscow University. It was possible to produce changes of gravitation from 2 g to 0.3 g lasting for 2–3 seconds. Changes in the postural reactions of the whole body and of its separate parts and coordination of movements were registered on an oscillograph. Alternate gravitational increases and decreases did not provoke any significant disturbances in the coordination of bodily position or in the position of its separate parts, or any interference with motor reactions. Analysis of equilibrium reactions of the whole body and its separate rigid parts, with the eyes either opened or closed, demonstrated that the role of the visual system in controlling these reactions is not noticeably increased when gravitation is reduced. The data obtained indicated that when gravity is decreased by 50–70%, proprioceptor control of position and movements does not suffer materially.

Keywords

Public Health Visual System Gravitational Field Bodily Position Equilibrium Reaction 

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. S. Gurfinkel'
    • 1
  • P. K. Isakov
    • 1
  • V. B. Malkin
    • 1
  • V. I. Popov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Experimental Biology and Medicine of the Siberian Department of the USSR Academy of SciencesNovosibirsk

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