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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 925–928 | Cite as

The role of the cerebral cortex in the pathogenesis of hemolytic anemia

Communication II. The effect of acute disturbance of higher nervous activity on the course of experimental phenylhydrazine-induced anemia
  • N. A. Grigorovich
Pathological Physiology and General Pathology
  • 16 Downloads

Summary

The author studied the effect of acute disturbance of the higher nervous activity, caused by overstrain of the processes of excitation in the cerebral cortex, on the course of experimental hemolytic (phenylhydrazine) anemia. In animals with disturbed dynamics of the cortical function the course of anemia after administration of the same doses of hemolytic toxin was much more severe than in intact animals. With further development of disturbance of higher nervous activity the processes of blood regeneration became less intense. Moderate normochromic anemia develops in intact animals under the influence of disturbance of higher nervous activity. This anemia progresses with further development of disturbances of cortical dynamics. The results of these experiments demonstrate the role of cortical mechanisms in the pathogenesis of phenylhydrazine anemia. They confirm the literature data on the dependence of erythropoietic function of bone marrow on the functional condition of the cerebral cortex.

Keywords

Public Health Bone Marrow Anemia Cerebral Cortex Functional Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau, Inc. 1959

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. A. Grigorovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathological PhysiologyThe N. I. Pirogov Odessa Medical Institute of theOdessaUSSR

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