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The central and peripheral action of chlorpromazine

  • E. A. Korneva
  • M. I. Yakovleva
Pharmacology

Summary

Cardiovascular and respiratory disturbances occuring in chlorpromazine administration are more pronounced in decerebrated animals than in the intact ones. Antagonistic relationships of chlorpromazine and adrenaline (according to the indices of arterial pressure and respiration) developed in decerebrated animals without significant differences from the animals with an intact central nervous system.

Intravenous injection of chlorpromazineto spinal animals and to those with a completely destroyed CNS caused a reduction of the arterial pressure and a change of the frequency of cardiac contractions; these changes however were less pronounced than in the animals with an intact central nervous system.

The interrelations of adrenaline and chlorpromazine in their effect on the arterial blood pressure level are antagonistic both in spinal animals and in those with a completely destroyed central nervous system. Bilateral vagotomy considerably decreases the effect of chlorpromazine on the cardiovascular system and respiration. The reticular formations of the brain stem is the main site of chlorpromazine application in its effect the cardiovascular system. However, aminazine had also a marked effect on the peripheral adrenaline structures.

Keywords

Adrenaline Cardiovascular System Arterial Pressure Brain Stem Arterial Blood Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Korneva
    • 1
  • M. I. Yakovleva
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Comparative Physiology and PathologyInstitute of Experimental Medicine of the AMN SSSRLeningrad

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