Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 57, Issue 2, pp 161–164 | Cite as

The blood supply of the brain under conditions of craniocerebral hypothermia

  • V. V. Suvorov
Pathological Physiology and General Pathology
  • 13 Downloads

Summary

Investigations were conducted on adult mongrel dogs. Hypothermia was created by chilling the brain through the surface coverings of the head, using a freon hypothermic apparatus. A pump-flow meter was used to record the amount of blood flowing out of the brain.

The cerebral blood supply dropped with reduction of the temperature of the animals. This reduction was more manifest (19 ml/min per degree, on the average) with decrease of the brain temperature to 31–30°C. Further changes in the jugular vein circulation were less significant (averaging 3.1 ml/min per degree). At a temperature of 23–22°C, the average volume of the blood flow constituted 30% of the initial value.

With normalization of the animals' temperature, the blood supply of the brain was restored.

Keywords

Public Health Blood Flow Blood Supply Jugular Vein Surface Covering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. V. Suvorov
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology of the Tyumen Pedagogical InstituteTyumenUSSR

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