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Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

, Volume 31, Issue 6, pp 349–354 | Cite as

The World Health Organization Short Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO DAS-S): a tool for the assessment of difficulties in selected areas of functioning of patients with mental disorders

  • A. Janca
  • M. Kastrup
  • H. Katschnig
  • J. J. López-IborJr
  • J. E. Mezzich
  • N. Sartorius
Original Paper

Abstract

The World Health Organization Short Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO DAS-S) is an instrument for clinicians' assessment and rating of difficulties in maintaining personal care, in performing occupational tasks and in functioning in relation to the family and the broader social context due to mental disorders. The WHO DAS-S was developed and underwent preliminarily testing in the context of two international field trials of the multiaxial presentation of ICD-10 for use in adult psychiatry. The instrument was found to be useful, user-friendly and reasonably reliable for use by clinicians belonging to different schools of psychiatry and psychiatric traditions. Further work on the WHO DAS-S should include development of national adaptations of the instrument, studies of concurrent validity of the instrument and modification of the instrument to accommodate changes in the next edition of the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH).

Keywords

Public Health World Health Organization Mental Disorder Social Context Field Trial 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Janca
    • 1
  • M. Kastrup
    • 2
  • H. Katschnig
    • 3
  • J. J. López-IborJr
    • 4
  • J. E. Mezzich
    • 5
  • N. Sartorius
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Mental Health and Prevention of Substance AbuseWorld Health OrganizationGeneva 27Switzerland
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryHvidovre HospitalHvidovreDenmark
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry, University of Vienna and LudwigBoltzman Institute for Social PsychiatryViennaAustria
  4. 4.San Carlos University Hospital, Department of PsychiatryComplutense UniversityMadridSpain
  5. 5.Division of Psychiatric Epidemiology, Mount Sinai School of MedicineCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland

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