Structure of the respiratory cycle during extinction and restoration of vital functions

  • S. V. Tolova
Pathological Physiology and General Pathology

Summary

Acute experiments on dogs were made to study by means of electromyography the structure of the respiratory cycle of the main and accessory respiratory muscles at various stages of extinction of the vital functions during death from blood loss and in the first 1.5–3 h of resuscitation after a 3–5 min clinical death. Dying of the animals is accompanied by disturbances in the reciprocal relations between the inspiratory and expiratory centers, as a result of which in the agonal state the expiratory and accessory respiratory muscles contract during inspiration. The mechanisms ensuring an active expiration are more sensitive to hypoxemia; during dying the expiratory muscles are excluded from the respiratory activity earlier and are restored to function later than the inspiratory muscles. Normalization of the activity of the expiratory muscles depends on the restoration of the parts of the brain stem on the border between the medulla oblongata and the pons Varoli. As evidenced by EMG data, the degree of pulmonary ventilation corresponds to the structure of the respiratory cycle much more than to its pneumographic characteristics.

Keywords

Public Health Blood Loss Brain Stem Respiratory Muscle Respiratory Activity 

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau Enterprises, Inc. 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. V. Tolova
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Experimental Physiology on Animate OrganismsUSSR Academy of Medical SciencesMoscow

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