Metal Science and Heat Treatment

, Volume 21, Issue 5, pp 400–403 | Cite as

Structure of white phases after heat treatment

  • A. M. Rozanova
  • L. I. Simakov
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Conclusions

During seizing of parts under conditions of vibration white phases are formed as the result of processes similar to processes during quenching with rapid cooling; the structure is the same as that in quenched steels but differs by its higher stresses and less stable condition; the white phase is more resistant to decomposition than martensite formed after standard quenching.

Keywords

Heat Treatment Martensite Stable Condition High Stress Rapid Cool 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Rozanova
  • L. I. Simakov

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