Soviet Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 8, Issue 4, pp 298–302 | Cite as

Diagram of state of the chromium-boron system

  • K. I. Portnoi
  • V. M. Romashov
  • I. V. Romanovich
Test Methods and Properties of Materials

Conclusions

  1. 1.

    On the basis of new investigations of the chromium-boron system and of a consideration of the literature data there is proposed a more plausible diagram of state of the system.

     
  2. 2.

    There has been confirmed the absence of the compounds Cr4B, Cr2B with a structure of the type CuAl2, Cr3B2, and CrB6.

     
  3. 3.

    For the compound Cr2B, with a Mn4B structure (as the most plausible), there has been determined a temperature of the peritectic decomposition of ∼1870°C.

     
  4. 4.

    Betweenα-Cr and Cr2B there is formed a eutectic, whose melting temperature is evidently effected by impurities.

     
  5. 5.

    The compound CrB2 is in equilibrium with a solid solution of chromium inβ-rhombohedral boron, and forms with it a eutectic containing ∼83 at.% boron and meltingat∼ 1830°C. The maximum solubility of chromium in boron is ∼2 at.%.

     
  6. 6.

    The compound known as CrB6 is chromium oxyboron and can be obtained by sintering the components at a not too high vacuum.

     

Keywords

Chromium Solid Solution Boron Melting Temperature High Vacuum 

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. I. Portnoi
    • 1
  • V. M. Romashov
    • 1
  • I. V. Romanovich
    • 1
  1. 1.Moscow

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