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Molecular Biology Reports

, Volume 6, Issue 3, pp 179–183 | Cite as

Physicochemical measurement of the base composition of mRNA-related sequences of the human α and β globin genes

  • Doroty Tuan
  • Bernard G. Forget
Article

Abstract

Hybrids formed between human α and β globin cDNA and total human cellular DNA have been studied by thermal denaturation and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation. From these studies, the weight average G+C content of human α globin cDNA has been determined to be 62%±2% and that of human β globin cDNA 51%±2%. These values correlate well with the results of G+C content of the human α and β globin cDNAs as determined by direct nucleotide sequence analysis of the cDNAs. Thermal denaturation and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation of DNA-cDNA hybrids can therefore provide accurate information on the base composition of mRNA related sequences of any single copy gene for which a relatively pure cDNA can be obtained, without the necessity for direct nucleotide sequence analysis.

Keywords

Chloride Nucleotide Cesium Copy Gene Single Copy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk B.V. Publishers 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Doroty Tuan
    • 1
  • Bernard G. Forget
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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