Metal Science and Heat Treatment

, Volume 18, Issue 6, pp 547–550 | Cite as

Phase and structural transformations during heating of metals and alloys

  • N. N. Lipchin
  • Yu. A. Belykh
  • S. A. Kokovyakina
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Conclusions

  1. 1.

    Structural inheritance results from the fact that recrystallization is inhibited by phase strain hardening during initial quenching, precipitation of particles of second phase, and redistribution of alloying elements with repeated heating.

     
  2. 2.

    Structural inheritance should occur in all polymorphous alloys with heating of a solid solution supersaturated with interstitial elements, since the precipitated particles of second phase are completely dissolved only at temperatures above Ac3. The temperature range of inheritance varies with the thermal stability of the second phase.

     
  3. 3.

    Recrystallization that eliminates structural inheritance occurs by means of the growth of austenite nuclei with another orientation, usually at boundaries of ferrite with carbide, and partially by means of the fusion of subboundaries, leading to an increase in the angle of turn at the boundary.

     

Keywords

Precipitation Carbide Ferrite Austenite Solid Solution 

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Literature cited

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. N. Lipchin
  • Yu. A. Belykh
  • S. A. Kokovyakina

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