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Soviet Powder Metallurgy and Metal Ceramics

, Volume 4, Issue 9, pp 731–736 | Cite as

Slip casting of titanium carbide components

  • A. G. Dobrovol'skii
  • E. Ya. Popichenko
Cermet Materials and Products

Summary

  1. 1.

    It was shown to be possible to obtain shaped articles from powders of TiC by casting.

     
  2. 2.

    The best suspension agent proved to be 2.5% water solution of carboxymethyl cellulose. The best casting properties in the slip were obtained with a solids-liquid ratio of 70∶30 and 67∶33.

     
  3. 3.

    Increasing the temperature of the mold and slip to 50° increases the density of the casting and the rate of casting.

     
  4. 4.

    Change in pH by adding HCl and NaOH to the slip, does not improve its casting properties. In connection with this, the method was simplified since it does not require pH control.

     
  5. 5.

    Density of the slip-cast articles is located within the limits which are obtained by other methods of fabrication. Uniform packing of the particles over the whole cross section of the casting gives certain advantages to this method.

     
  6. 6.

    Articles obtained by slip casting are sintered with a high but uniform shrinkage, and ensure the production of articles with the porosity of 11%.

     

Keywords

Cellulose Carbide Mold Shrinkage Water Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature cited

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Dobrovol'skii
    • 1
  • E. Ya. Popichenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Materials Problems Behavior, AS Ukr SSRUkraine

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