Environmental Geology

, Volume 24, Issue 2, pp 99–111 | Cite as

Environmental factors and the development of Bath Spa, England

  • G. A. Kellaway
Article
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Abstract

Thermal water springs at Bristol and Bath in west England have come under close scrutiny since the closure of Bath Spa in 1978. In order to protect the hot springs from dewatering and loss of pressure due to largescale quarrying and deep drilling, it is necessary to identify the sources and routes whereby the thermal water travels to its resurgences in the Avon valley. Control over deep water movements is exercised by the structure and size of the aquifers and aquicludes, modified by zones of Quaternary—Recent fracturing along which water movements have not been restricted or blocked by mineralization.

Key words

Spas thermal waters United Kingdom 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Kellaway
    • 1
  1. 1.LewesUK

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