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Journal of Wood Science

, Volume 48, Issue 2, pp 106–113 | Cite as

Genotypic effects on the variation of wood quality and growth traits in plantation forest made by cutting cultivars of Japanese cedar

  • Katsuhiko Takata
  • Yukio Teraoka
Original Article

Abstract

We studied the effect of genotypes of planting stocks regarding the variation of the modulus of elasticity of tree trunks on standing trees (trunk-MOE), tree height (TH), and diameter at breast height (DBH) in a 19-year-old Japanese cedar plantation made with root cuttings. Trunk-MOE was assessed nondestructively using a tree-bending method. Genotypes of individual trees were detected using the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. RAPD analysis revealed that the sampled plantation consisted of 14 genotypes. Genotypic effects on DBH and TH were unclear, and there was no significant difference among genotypes. This result indicated that an acquired variation should have more influence than an inherited variation on DBH and TH. For trunk-MOE, there were significant differences among the four largest genotypes at the 5% level. However the coefficient of variation in trunk-MOE of each genotype ranged from 7.5% to 26.8%. It seems reasonable to assume that the wide variation in trunk-MOE in a sampled plantation may depend on the environmental effect within a clone as well as on the genetic origin of clones. We therefore conclude that the use of multiple planting stocks from different cuttings for which the wood quality is unknown contributed strongly to the wide variation in trunk-MOE in the plantation of Japanese cedar.

Key words

Nondestructive test Genotypic effect Trunk-MOE RAPD Japanese cedar 

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Copyright information

© The Japan Wood Research Society 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Forest Biosciences, Division of Forest and Forest Products Sciences. Faculty of Agriculture, Graduate SchoolKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Faculty of AgricultureKagoshima UniversityKagoshimaJapan

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