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Cytotechnology

, Volume 15, Issue 1–3, pp 169–176 | Cite as

Optimization of vaccine production for animal health

  • W. Noe
  • R. Bux
  • W. Berthold
  • W. Werz
Article

Abstract

Vaccines on the basis of mammalian cell cultures are of major importance for human and animal health. Therefore efforts are undertaken for the improved production of more effective vaccines. Of course, the main purpose of all these approaches is to save lives and improve the quality of life for human beings. However, there is also some remarkable effort in the food industry and the associated animal production, especially in the case of some Flaviviridal viruses (BVD), where>80% of all cattle herds are found to be infected. These viruses can cause tremendous economic losses of calfs and embryos (Ames, 1990). Because of these facts, there is a continuous endeavour for improving the manufacturing of therapeutics or preventing agents such as vaccines for the treatment of cattle. The competitive economic situation and the specific market demands still require effective and high yield production methods, especially in the case of one of the most widespread viral diseases in cattle like BVD (Ames, 1990).

We have succeeded in establishing an improved method for the production of BVD on the basis of a continuous fermentation mode, that consist of modifications of the corresponding process and media improvements.

Key words

Flaviviridae BDV fermentation metabolism vaccines 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Noe
    • 1
  • R. Bux
    • 1
  • W. Berthold
    • 1
  • W. Werz
    • 1
  1. 1.Dr. Karl Thomae G.M.B.H.BiberachGermany

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